Explore the elegance and complexity of the brain and investigate how our 86 billion neurons contribute to our thinking, our behavior, and our sense of self.

Why study Neuroscience at Sewanee?

Neuroscience is a highly interdisciplinary field that spans the study of everything from single molecules to brain-wide circuits. The Sewanee neuroscience curriculum is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of cellular /molecular, behavioral, and cognitive approaches to exploring the brain. Flexible electives allow our students to expand their training into many related fields, including biomedical and health sciences, computational modeling, chemistry, and philosophy. Our professors provide a welcoming and collaborative environment where our students develop critical thinking skills, creativity, and a rigorous approach to understanding neuroscientific research.

A Sampling of Courses

Neuroscience

Programs of Study

Requirements for the Major & Minor in Neuroscience

Requirements for the Major & Minor in BiologyWebsite

Requirements for the Major & Minor in Psychology | Website

Meet our Faculty

What our faculty and students research

BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

Dr. Cammack’s research explores how drugs of abuse impact behavior. Specifically, she is interested in how abused drugs alter normal brain processes like learning, memory, and motivation; how sex differences and hormones alter drug seeking; and why similar individuals respond differently to the same drug. Her current research explores how prescription opioids, such as oxycodone, cause short- and long-term changes to motivation-related circuits in the brains of males and females.

MOLECULAR NEUROBIOLOGY

Dr. Shelley and the students in his lab investigates the molecular basis of behavior through a combination of patch clamp electrophysiology on isolated sea urchin cells and behavioral pharmacology of live urchins.The lab is particularly interested in the functioning of the ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors that underlie the generation of electrical activity in sea urchins.

EMOTION AND COGNITIVE CONTROL

Dr. Tiernan uses behavioral methods and time-locked EEG activity to study cognitive control operations such as error detection, inhibition, conflict monitoring, and emotion processing. As the director of the Emotion and Cognitive Control Laboratory, she regularly trains students in the event-related brain potential technique. Her recent work focuses on our ability to regulate our thoughts during times of emotional strain.

Emotion and Cognitive Control

Dr. Tiernan uses behavioral methods and time-locked EEG activity to study cognitive control operations such as error detection, inhibition, conflict monitoring, and emotion processing. As the director of the Emotion and Cognitive Control Laboratory, she regularly trains students in the event-related brain potential technique. Her recent work focuses on our ability to regulate our thoughts during times of emotional strain. Learn more about Dr Tiernan’s journey in this Faculty Spotlight article from the Sewanee Purple.

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Contact

Helen V. Bateman
Associate Professor of Psychology/Interim Chair of Neuroscience

hbateman@sewanee.edu

Woods Lab 327, Ext. 1712

 

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