CREATING PLACE—ROBERT BACHMAN

This course considers both how natural chemical processes shape our surroundings and how place is created by the intentional manipulation of matter to create objects of everyday use as well as of symbolic, cultural, or artistic importance. While developing an understanding of place-making broadly, the course focuses on both nature's creation of place and the role of art and cultural materials in defining place. Field trips and plenary lectures allow students to explore the local and regional context of place formation, engage in the practice of place-making, and synthesize knowledge across disciplines. Capstone projects provide opportunities for in-depth exploration.

COMMUNITY NARRATIVES OF THE SOUTH CUMBERLAND PLATEAU— DANIEL CARTER

This course introduces students to people, places, and events that helped shape the history, culture, and environment of the South Cumberland Plateau. Students explore multiple cultural, historical, and political narratives that tell the story of the region. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of historical and current land-use in shaping local environmental attitudes and perceptions. Field trips and plenary lectures allow students to explore the region, engage in the practice of place-making, and synthesize knowledge across disciplines. Capstone projects provide opportunities for in-depth exploration.

FROM SEWANEE TO SELMA: IDENTITIES, STORIES, AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT—LAUREN GOODPASTER

We all have our stories, and those stories shape who we are, what we believe, and how we engage with others. This course allows students to consider and reflect on their own identities and the lived experiences they bring with them as new members of the Sewanee community while also examining the lived experiences of diverse community members in both Sewanee and in Selma, Alabama. Through local travel as well as a group trip to Selma, Alabama, students will engage in hands-on learning through relationship building, service-learning, and public history collection. The course will culminate with a group project supporting the Roberson Project on Slavery, Race, and Reconciliation. Open only to new, first-year students.

DIGITAL EXPLORATIONS OF PLACE IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE—HANNAH HUBER

This class begins with an exploration of local places frequented by Ely Green, a biracial man whose autobiography details his Sewanee upbringing at the turn of the twentieth century.  Students explore the Ely Green collection in the University Archives and, together, create a digital map of his most frequented and beloved spots around Sewanee.  After the immersion period, the class learns foundational methodologies and tools in digital humanities to explore the places and spaces in short stories by authors ranging from Charles W. Chesnutt to Zora Neale Hurston. Open only to new first-year students.

MEDIEVAL SEWANEE—MATT IRVIN

An exploration of Sewanee’s medieval roots, as well as its “medieval” present, from the way it builds its buildings to the way in manages its forests and its noble “domain.” Students will experience various forms of medieval culture, including Old English riddles, Gothic cathedrals and French romances, and explore the way that Sewanee continues the millennium-long tradition of university education. Students will examine texts in our archives, works of art in local museums, and even Sewanee’s pre-modern history on its domain. 

MEMORY, HISTORY, AND STORY - SITE SPECIFIC DEVISED PERFORMANCE –JENNIFER MATTHEWS

Students in this class explore the histories, stories, and sites of the South Cumberland Plateau, University Domain and surrounding areas in order to create devised, site-specific performances. Devised performance techniques in this course use collaboration-from performers, designers, and researchers to create the performance outline/script- and locations that are specific to the telling of the stories selected by the students.

A LANDSCAPE FOR MEMORY—JOHN WILLIS

This course pursues a deeper understanding of the ways human action and the natural environment have shaped and been shaped by one another. Students explore the area's background, current status, and ongoing possibilities, from the deep time of geology to the era of human history and prospects for future development. Field trips and plenary lectures allow students to explore the region, engage in the practice of place-making, and synthesize knowledge across disciplines. Capstone projects provide opportunities for in-depth exploration.